Challenge Addict Club – Kathy From KeppenArt

Those of us on Fine Art America/Pixels who have completed three consecutive challenges are accepted into CAC, a just for fun group called the Challenge Addict Club.  It started when one member said that they felt like they were addicted to these challenges.

I was recently accepted into the “club” and must admit that I did feel a little addicted to signing up for each challenge.  As a matter of fact, I have signed up to participate in the next one that starts this coming Saturday.  How could I not sign up when the theme was Blue and blue is my favorite color?

Most of us think of addiction as a negative behavior.  In this case, the motivation to stay creative, regardless of my situation or emotional status on any given day, has been a positive movement for me.  As I said in an earlier blog post it has helped me to set goals, something that seems a little difficult for me as a dreamer.  Obviously it is also helping me to build up my online portfolio, especially still life images.

I’d like to take this opportunity to thank Abbie Shores, Artists Community Areas Manager & Technical Support Manager at Fine Art America/Pixels and Owner of Our Arts Magazine (which provided and hosts my blog).  She presents and manages these challenges and designed the beautiful CAC Logo shown above.

Thank you Abbie, for sharing your creative talent, your technical knowledge and especially for continuing to challenge me to push the limits of my creativity.

[ad_2]

Source link


The Green Theme – Kathy From KeppenArt

The latest art challenge that I have been working on has a specific theme: Green.  Being a lover of nature I thought that this challenge would be easy.  After all there are green trees and shrubs right out our door and green fruits and vegetables in our refrigerator.

But what about the descriptions that accompany my images?  That was not so easy.  I normally write a short poem or story or research facts and trivia to put into my descriptions.

Color is not a simple concept to define!  There are primary colors, secondary colors and tertiary colors. But all primary colors are not the same.  It depends on which color wheel or chart you are viewing.

There is something called a Color Space such as RGB, CMYK (more modern) or RYB (traditional).

There is an RBG color wheel and an RYB color wheel.  RBG stands for Red, Blue & Green and is used for electronic screens.  RYB stands for Red, Yellow & Blue and is used in traditional painting and coloring. Those three letters each represent the primary color on that particular color wheel.

Not to confuse you further but don’t forget that there are also different shades and hues of green from lime to forest in each of those color wheels.

Lastly you cannot research the color green without finding the psychology of color. Even within the study of psychology there are different aspects of how the green color is perceived both by our brain and our culture. Everything from positive emotional support, as green reminds us of nature which can be calming,   to negative emotions such as envy, jealousy or feeling & looking sickly or ill.   Culturally green can stand for (paper) money or for environmentally friendly business practices and lifestyles.

Whew!  As this post is being published I have finished three of the five days of the Green Theme Challenge and wrote my descriptions staying away from all the above criteria for the definition of this color.

Let’s hope I don’t “turn green” after all of this!

 

[ad_2]

Source link


New Challenges – Kathy From KeppenArt

In the last two blog entries I wrote about the Seven Day Challenge on Fine Art America/Pixels site(s).  That challenge had a specific theme which was Liquid.  The challenge was to process or paint, and upload a new image each day. 

Since my last blog post I also completed a Three Day Challenge with Any theme.   I ended up using the same theme for all three days even though that wasn’t required.

Starting next Monday I will be participating in a Five Day Challenge with a specific theme: Green.

I am more of a dreamer than a goal setter but these challenges have motivated me to “set a goal”.  I am being “challenged” each day to complete an image from start to finish.  All in one day.  That’s the goal.  That’s the goal that I’ve reached in both of these challenges.

Some days it was easy peazy to meet the goal. Other days I struggled, either with computer issues, creativity obstacles or both.  But I continued and finished the task each day. I met my goals.

Meeting my goals during those challenges allowed me to complete them.  It has also given me the confidence to sign up for a third challenge.

For those that are following my journey through these challenges I have created a special Collection on my site for those specific images.  The descriptions for each image will say for which challenge the image was created. Look for the Challenges Collection.

 

 

[ad_2]

Source link


Liquid Challenge Completed – Kathy From KeppenArt

In last week’s blog I told you about an artwork challenge that I was participating in on Fine Art America/Pixels.  I stated that, as allowed, I would be using photographs that I had taken in the past and processing them the appropriate day for the challenge since I don’t always take new photographs every single day.

I am happy to report that I did actually take, process and post new photographs every day of the challenge.  I must admit that a few days it was literally quite a “challenge”!

Take Day Five for example.  I did several test shots with different backgrounds and props the night before to get an idea of how to “stage” my still life for the next morning.  However, the next morning brought multiple problems with that particular image.  The worse of it was that my computer kept crashing as I was processing the final image!  Three times it crashed and I had to wait until it shut down enough to restart and reload my photograph software.  As a result of the problems that I encountered that day, it took me SIX hours to take and process that image instead of less than two hours start to finish.  Those six hours did not include posting the image and researching and writing the description. 

But, ALAS!  The challenge has been completed. 

Am I satisfied? 

Relieved?

Happy with the results? 

Yes. Yes. Mostly!

On to the next challenge –  Three Day Any Theme starting this week end.

 

*A special thank you to Abbie Shores, OAM owner and FAA/Pixels Community Manager and Head of Tech Support,  for creating and presenting the certificates of completion.

[ad_2]

Source link


Seven Day Challenge – Kathy From KeppenArt

There have been artwork challenges on Fine Art America/Pixels sites in the past several months for FAA/Pixel artists.

The present challenge is a Seven Day Challenge.  The participants must create and post a new piece of artwork each day for seven days.

This is the third challenge that has been available to FAA/Pixels members this year but it will be the first challenge that I have signed up to complete.

The last two challenges were for 30 days and 100 days.  I was not confident that I could meet either of those challenges at the times that they were presented.  However, I am determined to complete this challenge.

I don’t take new photographs every single day but for photographers, the challenge rules state that you can use former photos and do the processing (part of the creation process) and post on the challenge day.  I will be doing that for the majority of the week as this challenge, unlike the previous ones, has a specific theme.

The theme is Liquid: Water, drinks, lakes, oceans, etc. It must contain liquid of some kind.

Thursday, July 8th is Day One of this challenge and that corresponds with Blog Post Day here on Kathy From  KeppenArt.  As a matter of fact, I will be choosing (or photographing) an image to process and post as some of you are reading this blog.

You can find my challenge images in my Recently Added Images Collection found here: Recently Added Images. I will also be posting them daily on my Facebook Art Page here: KeppenArt FB Page.

 

[ad_2]

Source link